Ricky Gervais and Stephen Colbert Debate the Existence of God

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by John Ellis

When my editor at PJ Media sent me the link to a video of comedian Ricky Gervais having a quasi-debate with comedian Stephen Colbert and asked if I was interested in writing a response, I jumped at the chance. I did so, knowing the limitations of the format. With a word-count limit of 1,200, it’s difficult to adequately interact with complex issues and insert the gospel, too. You see, I’m a firm believer in the fact that Apologetics and Evangelism go hand in hand. Convincing someone of the existence of God shouldn’t be the endgame. Showing someone that they are dead in their trespasses and sins, cut-off from their Creator, and under His just and eternal wrath if they don’t repent of their sins and place their faith in the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ should be the endgame.

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My Top 5 Apologetics Books

apologeticsby John Ellis

About a year ago, my friend Joffre the Giant recorded a YouTube video in which he gives his five favorite books on apologetics. For some reason, I missed the video when it was first posted. This morning, however, I had the joy and privilege to finally watch it. Per usual with his videos/posts, it was thought-provoking, edifying, and entertaining; I highly encourage you to watch it (it’s at the bottom of this page). I also encourage you to follow Joffre the Giant on YouTube or at his blog. Even while disagreeing with him, I find much value and edification in his thoughts (except for when he mocks Baptists[1]).

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Christian Apologetics: Evidentialism

apologeticsby John Ellis

The oft repeated phrase “faith is by definition irrational” is as irksome as it is untrue. It’s irksome because it has contributed to a lack of robust faith among many American Christians. It’s untrue because, well, it’s untrue. Faith, specifically faith in the God of the Bible, is not irrational because, first and foremost, God is not irrational and neither is His revelation of Himself. The Evidentialist school of Apologetics recognizes this beautiful truth about God, the Bible, and the faith Christians place in the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

The Christian faith stands on the sure foundation of Jesus Christ. Narrowing it down even further, the Christian faith is dependent on the resurrection of Jesus. Writing to the Corinthian church, the Apostle Paul plainly stated, “if Christ has not been raised, then our preaching is in vain and your faith is in vain.”[1]

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Christian Apologetics: Presuppositionalism

apologeticsby Jed Kampen

A few years ago I heard about a man who was convinced he was dead. His wife was obviously very concerned about him, so she took him to see many friends, counselors, psychologists, even pastors, and no one could convince him he was dead. Finally, in desperation, she took him to see a medical doctor. The doctor asked the man, “Do you believe that dead men bleed?” The man thought about it and answered, “Well, I suppose their heart isn’t beating so, no, dead men don’t bleed.” The doctor then took a needle and pricked the man on the finger. The man stared at his bleeding finger, and the lights in his eyes came on, and he exclaimed “Well would you look at that. Dead men do bleed.”

(Read the first post in this series “Christian Apologetics: What’s the Point?”)

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Christian Apologetics: What’s the Point?

apologeticsby John Ellis

Last week, the news that Jesus’ burial place had been “discovered” began popping up all over my social media newsfeeds[1]. At first, I ignored the shared articles and the accompanying declamations of “Praise, God! The Bible is true!” because I tend to be skeptical of the validity, much less the use, of “major archeological finds that prove the Bible to be true.” But then The Gospel Coalition posted an article defending the claim.

Since TGC is an organization that I have great respect for and an organization that the Holy Spirit has used to bless me, I read Justin Taylor’s article. The article’s arguments make sense and are far afield from the sensationalism that is often the Achille’s heel of American Evangelicalism. Don’t misunderstand, I still have questions and some doubts. Regardless, I found the TGC article compelling and forwarded it to several friends.

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