Writer of The Shack, William Paul Young Outs Himself as a Heretic


The_Shack

by John Ellis

Two months ago, I ordered a copy of The Shack, the New York Times bestseller that has sold over twenty million copies.[1] I intended to read it and then write a review in time for the release of the movie. However, I was unable to force myself to finish reading it.

For the record, I wasn’t expecting to enjoy reading The Shack. Over the years, I’ve become very familiar with the contrived plot, blasphemous characters, and heretical teachings. It’s been inescapable. The number of family and friends who rave about the book match the family and friends who denounce the book.

Not long after its release, I researched the teachings of The Shack and concluded that, at best, it wasn’t worth my time reading; at worst, I would just become incensed over the heresy being subtly introduced (or not so subtly) to brothers and sisters in Christ. The devil is indeed a lion seeking to devour people. The movie, of course, changed my perspective on the value of me reading the book, and that brings me back to my opening paragraph. And, as stated, I couldn’t force myself to finish The Shack.

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My 2017 Reading List: February

stack-of-books

by John Ellis

A friend asked me if I read more than one book at a time. I replied in the affirmative and added that I have a system, of sorts. I also said that I would attempt to explain my system. Briefly, and suddenly realizing that this can barely be classified a “system,” I read from a novel every night before going to sleep. Other than that, I’m reading at least two theology books at a time as well as a general interest book. By general interest, I mean whatever my interest is at the time. At any given moment, my interest could be history or sociology or theatre (I make sure to read at least one Shakespeare play a month) or philosophy or, I don’t know, books on how to build a pergola in the backyard. So, for February, I read four novels (technically, one is a collection of short stories), six “general interest books,” and eight theology books.

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The 4 Hardest Books of the Bible to Read

reading-bible

by John Ellis

I have a love/hate relationship with click-bait titles. On one hand, click-bait titles feel a little dirty and, at times, dishonest. On the other hand, though, click-bait titles help me keep my job. There are many platforms on the interwebs competing for clicks. My editors at PJ Media have a job to do, and that job is making sure that eyeballs end up on my articles. Click-bait titles are part of that job.

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My 2017 Reading List: January

snoopy-readingby John Ellis

As 2016 came to a close, I began noticing a multitude of blog posts and articles listing the author’s 2016 reading list. I like the concept, but, not to brag, well, too brag a little, my year-end reading list would be incredibly long. I have no idea how many books I read in 2016, but my goal for 2017 is two hundred books (I’m working on another article fleshing out that goal a little bit). If I were to go back over 2016, I wouldn’t be too surprised to discover that I surpassed my 2017 goal in 2016. Even if I fell short of two hundred books by, say, fifty, an article listing the books with a short blurb about each would be well over 15,000 words[1]. At that point, I may as well write my own book.

In order to participate and still keep the articles a manageable length, I’ve decided to write month-end reading lists throughout 2017. Sadly, my reading list in January puts me behind the eight-ball when it comes to my reading goal for 2017. Thankfully, it’s the first month of the year, so I have plenty of time to catch up[2]. One note – I’m including books that I finished reading during the month. Three of the books on this list were begun in December. It will all work out because when December 2017 ends, there will undoubtedly be three or four books that I will be reading but will not finish until 2018. For example, I am currently reading four books that I started in January that will not show up until the February list.

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The 5 Best Books for Family Devotions

family-worship

by John Ellis

Sadly, I must admit that for years it was my wife who was the faithful engine driving our family devotions. Many evenings, I would hold my breath, hoping that she would forget to “remind” me that the kids’ bedtimes were nearing and I should begin family devotions soon. It’s not that I cognitively doubted the importance and efficacy of family devotions; I was well aware that God had called me to spiritually lead my family, and that family devotions were intimately wrapped up into that calling. It’s that, frankly, I didn’t want to have family devotions.

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My Top 5 Apologetics Books

apologeticsby John Ellis

About a year ago, my friend Joffre the Giant recorded a YouTube video in which he gives his five favorite books on apologetics. For some reason, I missed the video when it was first posted. This morning, however, I had the joy and privilege to finally watch it. Per usual with his videos/posts, it was thought-provoking, edifying, and entertaining; I highly encourage you to watch it (it’s at the bottom of this page). I also encourage you to follow Joffre the Giant on YouTube or at his blog. Even while disagreeing with him, I find much value and edification in his thoughts (except for when he mocks Baptists[1]).

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Abstaining From Alcohol: My Teetotaling Month

alcohol-abuse1by John Ellis

Roughly eight months before the Holy Spirit broke my will and gave me the gift of repentance and saving faith in Jesus, I stood on a downtown street at 2:00 in the morning, attempting to break the side window of a car. The girl I was seeing at the time, was sprawled out on the hood screaming obscenities at our friend inside the car who was laughing hysterically. We were all drunk. I wasn’t so drunk as to not realize that it was a terrible idea for my friend to drive, hence my attempts to break the window. Thankfully, the event ended without any further excitement. But by the end of it all, I was done; fed up with my friends and my lifestyle.

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