Marvel Movies Versus Martin Scorsese and Meg Ryan: Rebelling Against God’s Story

avengers-infinity-war-film-reviewby John Ellis

Making waves around Hollywood, filmmaking icon Martin Scorsese trained his sites on Marvel movies, specifically those included in the Marvel Cinematic Universe canon. Dismissing them as “not cinema” during an interview while at the BFI London Film Festival, the famed director of films like Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, and Goodfellas has earned the right to be heard, whether one agrees with him or not. And he’s apparently not exhausted his opinion on the matter, saying that movie theaters are now “amusement parks” during BAFTA’s David Lean Lecture on October 13. At a press conference the following day, the director of Netflix’s The Irishman insisted that, “We need cinemas to step up and show films that are narrative films.”

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Netflix and Christians: Our Mutual Exploitation of Image Bearers

Paris Games Week 2017 : Day Three At Porte De Versailles In Paris

by John Ellis

A bikini carwash is located around the corner from our house; across the street from our son’s elementary school. I suspect that if I were to check, I would find that its prices are substantially higher than other carwashes. Customers are paying for the “privilege” of leering at almost-nude young women doing menial work, after all. Make no mistake, for many of the men who wait in line for that “privilege” (if not all), the work of washing their vehicle is merely an incidental part of their lustful experience at the carwash. Whenever I drive by it, I sadly ponder how one of Satan’s lies is convincing us that oppression and exploitation equals freedom.

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Our First Love: The American Dream

god and country

by John Ellis

Below is the introduction to a short book titled Our First Love that I’m working on. Lord willing, I will be self-publishing the book in a few weeks. If you are curious as to why I will be self-publishing it, you can read about that by clicking here – a post I published earlier today providing an update on A Godless Fundamentalist. At this time, I’m publishing the introduction with the goal of prompting interest in the book prior to its publication (hopefully) and, combined with the post linked to above, giving those who have been asking some insight into what I’ve been working on.

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Central Florida: A Review


downtown orlando

by John Ellis

My family and I have lived in Central Florida for a little over 2 months, so, of course, it’s time for a review. A review filled with hot-takes, because a hot-take-less review is no fun.

Florida is essentially 3 states: Northern Florida, including the Panhandle where I grew up. Central Florida, where my family now resides after spending 6 years in the D.C. area (referred to as the DMV for District of Columbia, Maryland, and Virginia). South Florida, a magical place where I want to move although I realize deep inside of me that I don’t really want to live there.

An argument can be made that the state is really 4 states, with the Florida Keys being the fourth. However, I view the Keys as the real Florida that the other 3 sections strive to be but fall short of.

Even though I recognize that the Keys are superior to the rest of the state, having grown up in Florida, I love all of it and am happy to be home. That being said, every section has its strengths and weaknesses. There are things about Central Florida that I like and dislike. There is also some overlap between this area and the part of Florida I grew up in. The overall personality is the same. The smell is the same (except for those times as a kid when the wind was blowing the wrong way out of Cantonment). The seafood is just as delicious and plentiful. It’s all Florida, but I’m currently sitting in the middle of the state. So, below are some of my likes and dislikes about the region after 2 months as a resident of the Orlando area.

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White Nationalism, Gun Violence, and Donald Trump’s Complicity


good samaritan

by John Ellis

In January 2016, the pastor of a small Baptist church in Alabama made national news after he sent a letter rife with racism and anti-immigrant sentiments to the editor of the The Alabama Baptist. The letter (which can be read in full here) contains a barrage of hateful rhetoric and proudly and demonically crows the unbiblical claim that, “It is not a matter of loving your neighbor. My neighbors are the people that value the same standards of life and way of life that I value.”

As a “Baptist pastor,” Ted Sessoms should be very familiar with Jesus’ Parable of the Good Samaritan. Apparently, though, he’s not.

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Unfinished Theatre Business


empty theatre

by John Ellis

The first time I truly stepped through the fourth wall while acting, merging the world of imagination with the world of reality, I was terrified. So much so, I almost didn’t make it to my seat at the table where expectant, half-smiling audience members sat, staring at me. Every instinct I had was screaming for me to stay behind the door jamb serving as a stand-in for the proscenium arch.

No bright stage lights. No break between seats and stage. No flimsily constructed set where I lived and which the audience was only allowed to observe from a distance. No tacitly agreed upon relationship that kept me over here and the audience over there. There was nothing to hide behind as I sat down and began the play, making eye contact with the audience as I spoke directly to them.

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Netflix Does Not Care About Your Sanctification


netflix

by John Ellis

A couple of days ago, a friend mentioned how he had watched (started to watch) a movie from his childhood with his kids. “I forgot what was in it,” he confessed. “It was terrible!”

That started a brief conversation about how the MPAA ratings system works and how in the mid-eighties Tipper Gore helped change the content in movies. This may seem counter-intuitive to many people, but the movies of the seventies and the early eighties were generally much filthier and contained more nudity and explicit sexuality than the movies released from the mid-eighties until recently.

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