Hospitality Isn’t Hard

dinner-party-big-image

by John Ellis

It’s not a humble-brag to say that people frequently express amazement at how often my wife and I host large groups of people at our house. It’s not a humble-brag because my wife and I are puzzled by the amazement. We love having people over; we love large groups hanging around until the late hours of night talking and laughing. If anything, it would be an amazing and pointless act of self-sacrifice for my me and my wife to not frequently host large groups of people at our house. Hospitality is not a chore for us, by any stretch of the imagination. And, frankly, hospitality doesn’t need to be a chore for most people.

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Receiving Hospitality

Close up of a welcome mat in front of an inviting house

by John Ellis

Note: This article is a followed up to my post on Hospitality, and was originally written for and published in my church’s newsletter.

While reading the Bible with our kids, we often ask them how the passage relates to God’s promise found in Genesis 3:15. The reason we ask this is because Genesis 3:15 contains the Bible’s thesis – God’s plan to save a people unto Himself. Everything else in the Bible relates to that thesis. The story points to and culminates in the suffering servant who dies a humiliating death on the Cross. Of course, our Savior was raised from the dead, but not before going through a painful execution that was usually reserved for the most depraved criminals. Every passage in the Bible is a part of that story.

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Christian Hospitality

Close up of a welcome mat in front of an inviting house

by John Ellis

Note: this article was originally written for and published in my church’s newsletter.

One of the most beautiful passages in the Bible is found at the beginning of John 13. Prior to relating the story of Jesus washing the feet of his disciples, the Apostle John tells the readers that “Jesus knew that his hour had come to depart out of this world to the Father, having loved his own who were in the world, he loved them to the end.”[1]

Faced with his own imminent death, which was the ultimate act of love, Jesus’ thoughts and concerns were for his disciples. Jesus loved them. And throughout his life, Jesus demonstrated that love by caring for their spiritual and physical needs. To be clear, Philip Ryken explains that, “when John says that Jesus loved his own to the very end, he was talking about the love that he showed in the full work of his salvation. Yet there is also a more immediate context for John’s statement.”[2]

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