Aimee Byrd Asks About Men and Women ‘Why Can’t We Be Friends?’

aimee byrdby John Ellis

While working as a bartender at a large nightclub in Pensacola, FL, one of the bouncers asked me if I wanted to join him and several of our other male coworkers the next day when they visited the campus of the local Christian fundamentalist college. Asking why in the world they would want to do that, I was stunned by his answer.

“The girls there dress incredibly sexy!” he blurted out.

Dress sexy? That made very little sense to me. Like most Christian fundamentalist colleges, the dress code was strict and allowed for very little flaunting of flesh. Sexy was a descriptor that I never thought I would hear describe the clothes of the females on that campus. Especially not from guys who worked in a place where semi-nudity was a constant and where actual nudity was not uncommon. Sex permeated our work. By way of one example, the bouncers had been instructed to not be in too big of a hurry to intervene when customers engaged in public sex. The other customers enjoyed the show, after all.

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